Commonwealth Games will actively encourage athletes to use their voice on social issues

0
47


Commonwealth Games to actively encourage athletes to use their voice on social issues after previous Olympic podium protests ban

  • Athletes will be allowed to protest on podiums at 2022 Commonwealth Games
  • Commonwealth Games Federation will encourage athletes to use their voices
  • Dinas Asher-Smith criticised the ban on podium protests ahead of the Olympics


Athletes competing at the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games will be allowed to protest on podiums under new guidelines that will be released on Wednesday.

Sportsmail understands that the Commonwealth Games Federation will take the step of actively encouraging athletes to use their voice on social issues.

It will mean competitors in Birmingham this summer will be free to make gestures on the podium or start or finish lines, which could include taking the knee, or showcasing a badge or symbol in solidarity with a cause.  

Athletes competing at the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games will be allowed to protest on podiums under new guidelines

Athletes competing at the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games will be allowed to protest on podiums under new guidelines

Messages that express hate or protest against a specific organisation or country will not be allowed under the new guidelines.

The move to allow protests, particularly those on the podium, are a marked contrast to the controversial stance of the International Olympic Committee. 

While they have relaxed rules around athletes demonstrating at a Games, they have been criticised for continuing to refuse to allow protests on podiums.

World 200m champion Dina Asher-Smith was among the athletes who criticised the ban on podium protests ahead of the Tokyo Olympics

World 200m champion Dina Asher-Smith was among the athletes who criticised the ban on podium protests ahead of the Tokyo Olympics

One of the Olympics' most iconic moments have been the black power salute by USA athletes Tommie Smith (centre) and John Carlos (right) back in 1968

One of the Olympics’ most iconic moments have been the black power salute by USA athletes Tommie Smith (centre) and John Carlos (right) back in 1968

World 200m champion Dina Asher-Smith, who is expected to compete in Birmingham, was among the athletes who criticised the ban on podium protests ahead of the Tokyo Olympics. 

Speaking in August, she said: ‘When it’s something so close to your heart — particularly for me that topic would be racism – I just think you can’t police people’s voice on that.

‘Some of the Olympics’ most iconic moments have been the black power salute by Tommie Smith way back (in 1968).

‘That is something people remember the Olympics for, something they’re very proud to see at the Olympic Games. 

‘So to think they’re suddenly going to get up and say “absolutely not”, I think they’d be shooting themselves in the foot.’

Advertisement



LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here