Dad's fury at being fined £650 for driving outside his own home

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Abdul Noormohamed entered a “school streets’ zone” during restricted hours even though he lives in the area covered by the scheme. The 39-year-old, who registered his car and van during the initial trial period in 2020, says he is “living in a prison” on his own road in Harrow, northwest London.

Speaking to My London, the dad said: “I don’t understand what’s gone on. They’re sending fines to someone who lives in the zone, surely they can see that isn’t right if we’re supposed to be exempt?

“My head is spinning, it’s caused so much extra effort and stress. We can’t have visitors, we don’t get deliveries. It’s got to the point now where we’re scared to go out on the road. It’s like being a prisoner in your own home. I’m not usually one to complain – sometimes it’s just easier to pay the fine. But this is just crazy.”

Mr Noormohamed has recently had five tickets for entering the zone. 

School streets are roads where traffic is restricted during drop off and pick up times near schools, so Mr Noormohamed registered his two vehicles when the Harrow scheme was trialled.

When this was made permanent, he was told he would not need to register again. 

But the father was ticketed after driving his family car, often used to get his children to after-school activities, the mosque and to visit friends and family.

He has complained to Harrow Council but remains frustrated.

Friends and family are also wary of visiting Mr Noormohamed’s home due to the scheme.

“My house is usually very active, my door is always open,” the motorist continued.

“I’d have people coming and going all day every day, but I can’t anymore as they’re scared of getting fined.

“What are we supposed to tell people? That they can’t come to my home? That they have to fight to find a parking space somewhere else and then walk?”

Harrow Conservatives’ leader Cllr Paul Osborn said it was important to make the right call on this scheme to avoid changing it at a later date if it proved unpopular.

Other traffic measures in the borough, such as pop-up cycle lanes and low-traffic neighbourhoods, were removed after they faced strong opposition from residents, costing the council £75,000.

A Harrow Council spokesperson said: “We are aware of this case and are working with the resident to help resolve the issue.”



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