Darts world champion Peter Wright reveals he celebrated title with a 'cup of tea and a Pot Noodle'

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Darts world champion Peter Wright shows proof of his calmer side by revealing he celebrated Alexandra Palace triumph with a ‘cup of tea and a Pot Noodle’… as ‘Snakebite’ revels in new sticky rib flavour

  • Peter Wright won his second world darts title with a 7-5 win over Michael Smith  
  • The Scotsman picked up a £500,000 cheque in prize money by winning the title
  • But Wright revealed his Monday celebrations were more modest than his hair
  • The 51-year-old spent the evening celebrating with a cup of tea and a Pot Noodle 


Peter Wright has revealed he celebrated his second PDC World Championship darts title on Monday night in calm fashion – with a cup of tea and a Pot Noodle. 

‘Snakebite’ Wright edged out a thrilling final at London’s Alexandra Palace, coming from 5-4 down to beat Englishman Michael Smith 7-5 to become just the sixth darts player to win the world title on multiple occasions. 

And the 51-year-old Scotsman, who was backed at 80/1 to win the tournament before it began, revealed his calmer celebrations through the new sticky rib Pot Noodle flavour. 

Peter Wright revealed he celebrated his PDC world title with a 'cup of tea and a Pot Noodle'

Peter Wright revealed he celebrated his PDC world title with a ‘cup of tea and a Pot Noodle’

The Scotsman won his second world title in London with a 7-5 victory over Michael Smith

The Scotsman won his second world title in London with a 7-5 victory over Michael Smith

Asked by BBC Radio 5 Live whether he had a sore head on Tuesday morning, Wright replied: ‘No, I celebrated with a nice cup of tea and a Pot Noodle when I got back. It was the new sticky rib flavour.’ 

By winning the Sid Waddell trophy on Monday night, Wright has pocketed £500,000 in prize money, with the World Championships holding the biggest money pot in the sport. 

Wright raced into a 2-0 lead but Smith, who was playing in his eighth televised final but will have to wait for his first ever title, pegged the game back to 2-2. The match remained tied up until 5-5 when Wright claimed the final two sets, and three in a row, to win the title on double 16.

Both players showed nerves early on – with the pair needing 28 darts to close out the second leg and Wright complained about a breeze on stage. 

Wright (right) celebrated his second world title with wife Joanne and father-in-law Paul (left)

Wright (right) celebrated his second world title with wife Joanne and father-in-law Paul (left)

The Scotsman admitted on Tuesday that the nerves were getting the better of him towards the beginning and said the standard from both players was not at their usual level.   

‘I think so,’ Wright said on Tuesday morning when asked if there were nerves. ‘I didn’t feel nervous but it must’ve been something as it was very pretty at the beginning. 

‘The standard was nowhere near what the both of us had been playing before to get to the final. I was telling myself off. 

‘I’ve done that in the past and you should never do that, so at the break near the end I stopped doing it and concentrated on my throw. All the hours of practice paid off.’ 

Both Smith (left) and Wright (right) showed nerves early on in the Alexandra Palace final

Both Smith (left) and Wright (right) showed nerves early on in the Alexandra Palace final

Both players were tearful at the end of the contest, with Smith left in agony after missing several doubles to close out legs, despite breaking Gary Anderson’s record for the most 180s in a championship with 72. 

Wright also revealed that the chants from the London crowd of ‘Scotland get battered, everywhere they go’ actually spurred him to victory. 

‘I’m in tunnel vision,’ Wright added. ‘I love the sound from the crowd even if they’re booing me – which they were as they wanted the underdog in Michael Smith to win. However, I got them on side as at the end they were cheering for me.

‘It’s a great achievement – especially with the high standard of starts at the moment. To win it once you may get called lucky, but to win it twice in a couple of years is great.’

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