Dog crisis in Ukraine as Putin forces hit at least two shelters – animals flee after loud

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Over one million people have reportedly fled Ukraine since Russia began its invasion on February 24, many leaving behind beloved animals to brace the war zone.

Some brave volunteers have stayed behind to help support the animals still in the country facing the ongoing devastation by Putin’s troops.

Aid groups across the world have banded together in support of the animals and people affected by the atrocities including The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) which supports three animal shelters in Ukraine.

The group is now desperately trying to support the some 1,100 dogs in Ukraine, with dwindling food supplies and little access to medical care.

Two Ukrainian animal shelters are said to have been hit by Russian missiles, killing many of the cats and dogs that were inside.

Some brave volunteers have stayed behind to help support the animals still in the country facing the ongoing devastation by Putin’s troops.

Aid groups across the world have banded together in support of the animals and people affected by the atrocities including The International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) which supports three animal shelters in Ukraine.

The group is now desperately trying to support the some 1,100 dogs in Ukraine, with dwindling food supplies and little access to medical care.

Two Ukrainian animal shelters are said to have been hit by Russian missiles, killing many of the cats and dogs that were inside.

The Holivka dog shelter, located in eastern Ukraine, was hit by a shell on February 27, killing one dog.

On March 1, another shelter, Pif, located in Donetsk, was attacked by Russian soldiers, with “many dogs and cats killed”.

The IFAW said animal shelters are normally left alone during conflicts similar to this one – but they have not escaped the attack in Ukraine.

READ MORE: Putin is rattled! Dream of ‘lightning war’ turning into ‘nightmare’

Kind-hearted volunteers for IFAW have already dispersed £114,000 of emergency aid and are raising more to support the animals in dire need.

James Sawyer, the charity’s regional director, told The Mirror: “The most helpful thing right now is to provide local groups with resources. We can’t put boots on the ground, it’s too dangerous.”

“The shelters workers are currently still in place and we will provide resources so they can carry on caring for the dogs. The conditions are very difficult”.

He described the staff’s reluctance to cook hot food for the dogs as they fear fire could draw attention to the shelter, meaning they are even more desperate for dry food.

The staff are still able to purchase supplies locally but this will not be sufficient over a longer period, and the IFAW warn that “local supplies are running out”.

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The animal welfare group is working closely with authorities to provide aid packages but is finding it difficult to get information out of the country.

Last week, the IFAW reported that both its partner shelters in Ukraine had received some emergency funds that helped pay for pet food, veterinary supplies and wages for daily care staff.

A message from one shelter partner read: “Our dogs are very scared. Many do not leave [their dog houses]. [Indoor] dogs do not go outside. We are without rest and breaks at the shelter.

“It’s very difficult for us right now. We are grateful to everyone. We really want peace. We are extremely tired mentally and physically.

“You are there and we feel it. THANKS! 10,000 times THANK YOU to everyone!”



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