'I have to be blunt' Martin Lewis gets emotional on BBC over energy crisis 'frustration'

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Martin Lewis became emotional as he discussed the messages he gets from those struggling to afford the increases in energy bills. The personal finance expert apologised to the BBC’s Tony Livesey as he passionately described people “choosing whether to freeze or starve in a first-world country”. He said that the big difference between the situation at the start of the pandemic and now is that “I don’t know where the help is coming from”.

Millions of people in the UK have already felt the impact of an unprecedented £700-a-year rise in energy costs.

The massive rise in energy costs coincides with a hike in a host of bills, including council, car and water.

The 54 percent rise in the energy price cap means a household using a typical amount of gas and electricity will now pay £1,971 per year.

Governor of the Bank of England, Andrew Bailey, said the country was facing the biggest single shock from energy prices since the 1970s.

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BBC’s 5Live host Tony Livesey said: “The pandemic was the thing we couldn’t control but we were all going through it. And now again with energy prices.”

Mr Lewis responded: “I think about the anxiety and the level of sick I feel in my stomach.

“People will say, ‘Oh, but you’re a millionaire’. I’m an emotional guy.

“Nobody could have my mailbag and not feel fundamentally depressed at the moment.

“I think the only time like this I can remember was the week of the pandemic before furlough was announced when we had no certainty and no help, that level of panic.

The founder of MoneySavingExpert.com added: “I try not to be party political but I have to be blunt, the country needs more help.

“I’m sorry the frustration is coming out but we are a first-world rich nation.

“I am on your bloody radio station talking about how people are going to survive as to whether they choose to freeze or starve.”

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) found that some of the poorest in Britain are being forced to make tough choices between heating and eating due to the soaring costs.

According to an extensive survey of more than 13,000 adults in Great Britain, the ONS found that 34 percent of those affected report using less gas and electricity while 31 percent are spending less on food.



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