Johnson & Johnson: Shots may be in Americans’ arms within next 2 days


Johnson & Johnson said Monday that its newly approved single-dose COVID-19 vaccine has already been loaded onto trucks — and could be in Americans’ arms within two days.

“It’s literally on trucks as we’re talking,” J&J CEO Alex Gorsky told NBC’s “Today” show.

“We think literally within the next 24 to 48 hours, Americans should start receiving shots in arms.”

Gorsky said the drugmaker will be shipping out 4 million doses immediately to states, but will be ramping up its supply throughout the next year.

“We’re committed to doing 100 million by June of this year, and up to a billion by the end of 2021,” Gorsky said.

The US Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization Saturday to the shot, which will be the first one-dose COVID-19 vaccine available in the US. 

The vaccine was shown to be 66 percent effective in preventing illness in a large-scale trial, while its rivals from Moderna and Pfizer had efficacy rates of more than 90 percent.

Johnson & Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky says the company is "committed to doing 100 million [shots] by June of this year."
Johnson & Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky says the company is “committed to doing 100 million [shots] by June of this year.”
Christopher Goodney/Bloomberg via Getty Images

But Gorsky said that Americans should have a “lot of confidence and trust in knowing they’re getting a very safe and effective, one-shot vaccine.”

“When you look at the numbers around the vaccine, the numbers that are most important is that it works 85 percent of the time against serious disease and it kept all the patients out of the hospital and from dying, even against these new and really challenging variants,” Gorsky said.

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is set to be a cost-effective alternative to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines.
The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is set to be a cost-effective alternative to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines.
ABACA USA/INSTARimages.com

He also noted that the study was conducted around the world at a time when the virus was more prevalent than the other vaccine trials.

“What’s really important to remember about this vaccine is that when we conducted our clinical trials in October of 2020 to about January of 2021, this was during the time when the incidents rate of the virus was really about at its peak,” he said.

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