Major driving law changing in weeks as electric car owners will pay to charge in Edinburgh

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City of Edinburgh Council also said it would begin fining owners who left their electric cars at the charging points overnight, in addition to the law change. The revenue raised from the fines and the charging costs would be reinvested into electric car charging infrastructure in the city.

From Sunday, May 1, standard 7.4kW chargers will cost £0.25 per kWh and drivers can stay for a maximum of 12 hours, with those staying longer facing a £30 penalty.

Fast 22kW chargers are slightly more expensive at £0.30 per kWh with a maximum stay of three hours and fines of £30.

Those who have higher-end electric vehicles can use rapid 50kW chargers which cost £0.35 per kWh, but can only stay for 30 minutes or risk a £30 overstay penalty.

All chargers, regardless of their speed, have a minimum charge of £1.

READ MORE: MINI Electric review

Transport Scotland gave the council £2.3million to install 81 chargers at 141 bays in residential streets and park and ride sites around the city, which will be available for use by summer.

Councillor Lesley Macinnes, Transport and Environment Convener, said: “We’re in the process of introducing even more electric vehicle charging points across the city, which will provide additional fast, convenient charging for people living in and travelling to and from the city.

“Increasing this kind of infrastructure is essential for supporting people to make the shift to more sustainable forms of transport, like electric cars, which is vital if we are to become net zero by 2030.

“Any income generated from charges introduced next month will help us to maintain and continue developing our charging network.”

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In comparison, Westminster has more than 1,100 public charging points, with Ginny Buckley, founder and CEO of electrifying.com, saying this is evidence of the UK being a “two-tier” nation for EV charging.

Ms Buckley said: “We’re set for sunny skies this weekend, and although your bags may be packed as you head off for a UK break this Easter, you may find that you could have difficulty finding a public charger.

“The UK is a two-tier nation when it comes to charging infrastructure for electric cars and you’ll find many more chargers in the tiny area of Westminster than in popular staycation counties like Cumbria and Dorset.

“There are some charge points which are notoriously unreliable too, which means the number of chargers isn’t keeping up with the growth in electric car ownership. 

“As a result, there may well be some frustrated drivers suffering from charging anxiety over the Easter break.

“Government plans to boost infrastructure and penalise operators who don’t keep their network online are welcome, but my fear is that the roll out of these plans won’t be able to keep pace with our rapid acceleration to electric driving and we’ll see some areas of the UK continue to lag behind.”

In comparison, Westminster has more than 1,100 public charging points, with Ginny Buckley, founder and CEO of electrifying.com, saying this is evidence of the UK being a “two-tier” nation for EV charging.

Ms Buckley said: “We’re set for sunny skies this weekend, and although your bags may be packed as you head off for a UK break this Easter, you may find that you could have difficulty finding a public charger.

Ms Buckley said: “We’re set for sunny skies this weekend, and although your bags may be packed as you head off for a UK break this Easter, you may find that you could have difficulty finding a public charger.



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