SPFL seeks to drive down the cost of VAR after clubs balked at the near £100,000-a-year bill

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SPFL seeks to drive down the cost of VAR after clubs balked at the near £100,000-a-year bill amid warnings Scottish football faces being left behind without video technology

  • Scottish Premiership clubs are wavering over the rising cost of introducing VAR 
  • Projected cost for each club has risen from £60,000 to almost £100,000 a year
  • A delayed vote by top-flight sides on VAR is set to take place in the spring 


Premiership clubs are wavering over the rising cost of introducing VAR to Scottish football. 

Projected to cost top-flight clubs £60,000 each per annum, that figure has now surged closer to £100,000. 

And the SPFL are now looking at ways to drive down the price before a delayed vote by top-flight sides finally takes place in the spring.

Premiership clubs are wavering over the rising cost of introducing VAR to Scottish football

Premiership clubs are wavering over the rising cost of introducing VAR to Scottish football

Celtic and Rangers are pushing hard for the introduction of video technology after another weekend of refereeing controversy. 

Giovanni van Bronckhorst’s team had two penalty claims overlooked as they dropped two points at Dundee United.

Celtic’s 3-2 win over Dundee also featured spot-kick incidents for both sides that would likely have gone to video review.

Successfully used in Scotland for the Euro 2020 finals, VAR is backed by the Scottish Senior Referees’ Association and, if approved, could be in place as early as January next year.

Scottish Premiership clubs are keen to follow the English Premiership by helping officials

Scottish Premiership clubs are keen to follow the English Premiership by helping officials

Celtic and Rangers are impatient to press ahead even if others drag their feet.

Desperate to avoid a two-tier system of justice where some Premiership grounds offer access to video review while others don’t, the SPFL are trying to find a cost effective consensus all 12 clubs can vote for next month.

While the SFA have offered to underwrite a third of the annual expense and have laid on Hampden simulators to train up referees, costs to clubs have increased due to a proposal to move from four fixed cameras to six manned cameras at games.

Video assistant referees employed by the English Premier League also operate from a central hub at Stockley Park, a business estate in west London.

And Scotland’s clubs favour a similar arrangement in Glasgow.

Last night, Ross County chairman Roy MacGregor added his voice to those urging Premiership clubs to find a cost compromise they can live with to avoid Scottish football being left behind.

Giovanni van Bronckhorst’ Rangers had two penalty claims overlooked at Dundee United

Giovanni van Bronckhorst’ Rangers had two penalty claims overlooked at Dundee United

‘I think it is better for football if VAR comes to pass,’ he told Sportsmail. ‘Clubs have to get the best deal they can, but decision-making will be better for everyone.

‘We will fall behind other countries if we don’t implement this.

‘I don’t think it’s something we should compromise on.

‘I don’t know the figures involved, but I think we have to work hard to get the budget right so everyone can live with it because VAR helps the game.

‘Referees are part of our game and we want the decision-making to be better.

‘I don’t think we have any option. I think we have got to find the best financial solution we can.’

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